Spicy Honey Dip

When I signed up for this month’s Blogging Marathon and picked this theme of ‘Condiments’, my first plan was to finally make and post the ‘Dukkah’, an Egyptian spice blend that is used as a dip along with with olive oil for bread. But then I swayed towards hung curds and have been immersed in it ever since.

I figured I would complete the hung curd in my fridge as well as a trio of hung curd dips and leave the Dukkah for another day. That also gives me a reason to bake another loaf of bread!

I adapted this recipe from the book, ‘Diva Green’ by Ritu Dalmia which has some fabulous vegetarian recipes written in a simple style. I didn’t have Tabasco sauce and red chillies and so they were substituted. Also I played around with the proportions till I got a lovely sweet and spicy flavour rolled in one dip.

WHAT WE NEED

60 gms Hung curd

12 gms Honey

1 tsp Sesame seeds

1 small green chilly

1 tsp Hot & sour sauce

Pinch of ground peppercorns

Salt

WHAT TO DO

  • Add all the ingredients into a blender jar
  • Blend to a smooth dip
  • Else, you can also mix the ingredients by hand to get a comparatively coarse dip
  • Enjoy!

This is my post for the Blogging Marathon under the theme, ‘Condiments’.

BMLogo

Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing this BM

Mint & Coriander Dip

Continuing with my hung curd spree, today I am posting a quick mint and coriander dip with hung curd. We celebrated my daughter’s birthday over the weekend which is the reason I was left with some mint & coriander chutney as also a whole load of chips that feature in the photos.

So I just mixed the hung curd and chutney to get a creamy dip. It is a nice way to revamp leftover chutney and get a smooth dip. I need some carrots now with this dip to balance out all the cake I have been eating.

WHAT WE NEED

3 tbsp Mint & coriander chutney

2 tbsp Hung curd

Salt

WHAT TO DO

  • Mix the chutney with the hung curd with a whisk or in a blender
  • Check for the saltiness and add salt accordingly
  • Serve with carrots or chips (chips actually 😉
  • Enjoy!

NOTES

  1. To make mint & coriander chutney, take a small bunch of fresh coriander, 4 sprigs of mint, a couple of garlic cloves and 3-4 green chillies. Mix them all with salt in a blender. Add water to form a smooth mixture. You can replace the water with some extra virgin olive oil. If you are using water, drain it out before adding to hung curd.

This is my post for the Blogging Marathon for the theme, ‘Condiments’.

BMLogo

Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing this BM

Spicy Hung Curd Dip

There are times when I get very hung up on certain dishes and ingredients and keep repeating them so often that the husband and daughter finally do an intervention only for me to get obsessed over the next dish. Now it is the hung cure time. I keep straining the curd in the cheesecloth and then hunt around for a recipe to use it up.

And is it not the perfect time to be hung up on hung curd when I have a ‘Condiments’ theme for the Blogging Marathon this week. This is a quick dip that only needs few basic ingredients always available at home and a blender. This dip works with chips as well as vegetables and is a nice one to have handy for guests.

Recipe adapted from here

WHAT WE NEED

1/4 cup Hung curds

2 Tomatoes, medium

1/2 tsp Curry powder

Pinch of Red chilly powder

Salt

WHAT TO DO

  • Chop the tomatoes roughly
  • Add it along with all the ingredients to a blender jar
  • Blend it to a smooth consistency
  • Enjoy with carrots or chips!

NOTES

  1. To make hung curd, add some regular homemade or store bought curds to a cheesecloth or kitchen towel. Tie the cloth and hang it over a vessel. The end of the cloth should not touch the bottom of the vessel to ensure the whey doesn’t go back into the curds. Keep it in the fridge for 24 hours and hung curd is ready for use

This is my post for the Blogging Marathon for the theme, ‘Condiments’.

BMLogo

Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing this BM

Creamy Carrot Sandwich

DSC_1221

I don’t know about you but in my house, the carrot gets a bit of a step-motherly treatment. I take it for granted, don’t give it too much of importance, use it as a filler in combination with other vegetables and its presence solely dependent on the quantity needed and never stopping to consider its feelings. Basically, it always plays a supporting role and never gets its due limelight.  So when I picked this theme of one vegetable in three ways, I figured it would be nice to hero the carrot for once.

Since the husband is travelling I am having a dairy overflow – too much curd and too much milk. So, I figured I could make some hung curd and have a fabulous sandwich with it. It turned out creamy and delicious with the daughter happily munching away and I have been patting my back ever since.

Serves 2

WHAT WE NEED

8 slices of bread

1 carrot, grated

Hung curd from 1/2 litre curd

1 tsp chilly powder / curry powder / mixed dried herbs

Butter to toast the bread

Salt

 

WHAT TO DO

  • Toast the bread slices with butter
  • In a bowl, mix together the hung curd, grated carrot, spice powder and salt
  • Apply the carrot mixture on a slice of bread generously and cover it with another slice
  • Repeat the same for the remaining bread slices
  • Enjoy!

 

NOTES

  1. Though it is not mandatory to toast the bread, it is recommended because the bread otherwise is unable to hold it together and gets soggy due to the hung curd

DSC_1222

This is my post for the Blogging Marathon under the theme, ‘One vegetable three ways’.

BMLogo

Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing this BM

Labneh

DSC_1219

The third and final dish of the Lebanese cuisine theme is Labneh which stands testimony to the fact that not all awesome dishes need to have a tough recipe. Labneh is seen as Lebanese cream cheese and is just as thick and creamy. And all you need to make yourself a batch of labneh is patience – lots of it. This is a no cook recipe and so it is very easy. But if you need a batch of labneh today, you need to have started making it two days ago. Yes, it takes that long but we know it is quite worth the wait.

DSC_1263

Makes one bowl of labneh

Recipe adapted from here

WHAT WE NEED

Greek yogurt / thick curds                500gms

Fresh lemon juice                               1/4 tsp

Salt                                                          a pinch

Zaatar powder                                      1 tbsp

Olive oil                                                  2-3 tbsp
WHAT TO DO

  • Take a cheesecloth and line it over a bowl
  • In another bowl, mix the yogurt, lemon juice and salt
  • Transfer the yogurt mixture onto the cheesecloth
  • Tie up the cheesecloth over a ladle or large spoon such that the cheesecloth does not touch the bottom of the bowl similar to how it is done to obtain hung curd
  • This ensures that the whey drained from the yogurt will not find its way back into the cheesecloth
  • Keep the yogurt with the bowl in the refrigerator for around 24 hours
  • After 12 hours, check the bowl and pour the whey out of the bowl 
  • After 24 hours, transfer the hung curd mixture to a bowl
  • Add the olive oil and zaatar powder
  • Serve cold with vegetable slices or warm pita bread
  • Enjoy!

DSC_1160

This is my post for the Blogging Marathon under the theme, ‘Lebanese cuisine’.
BMLogo

Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing this BM

Dahi ke Tikki

dsc_0407

I think it is pretty obvious by now that I am a die-hard fan of Venkatesh Bhat, the chef at Accord in Chennai. His cooking show ‘Samayal Samayal” is the only show I watch without fail. The best part about his show is that he makes most dishes seem easily achievable and cooking a pleasure rather than a chore it usually becomes. Another amazing aspect is that his recipes work so well. I have tried quite a few of them and had amazing results.

This recipe was shared on his program last year and I had bookmarked it for a very long time. The main ingredient for this tikki is hung curd which was not easily achievable during my Malaysian days. Once I got full fat milk in Bangalore, I was reminded of this dish and got to it at once. I used the curd set from full fat milk (Nandini Gold) and the results were yummy and soft tikkis, almost melt in your mouth. I would urge you to make smaller tikkis than I did because it is quite filling and tough to eat one entire tikki of this size at one go. I made 6 tikkis but I am guessing 8 or 9 would have been more manageable. So here goes –

Makes 8-9 medium sized tikkis

WHAT WE NEED

Hung curd                         250 gms

Paneer                                100 gms

Roasted gram                   150 gms

Ginger garlic paste          1-2 tsp

Green chillies                    1-2

Coriander leaves              small bunch

Almonds                             6-8

Cashew                               5-6

Raisins                                6-8

Salt

Ground pepper

Cornflour for dusting

Ghee for shallow frying

WHAT TO DO

  • To get hung curd, take 900 ml or 1 litre full fat curd in a cheesecloth, tie it up and let it hang in a vessel overnight or 6-7 hours in the refrigerator. The entire water content of the curd needs to drip out and the remaining curd in the cheesecloth is the hung curd and should be around 250 gms.
  • Use a blender or mixer and reduce the roasted gram to a fine powder
  • Grate or crumble the paneer till it has no large or small pieces and can be easily mixed into a dough
  • Combine all three of the above ingredients with ginger garlic paste and salt and make it into a fine dough.
  • Add freshly ground pepper and mix it again
  • Set the mixture aside for 10-15 minutes
  • Finely chop green chillies and coriander leaves
  • Add the almonds, cashews and raisins to the blender and make them into a coarse mixture
  • Mix the dry fruits with the chillies and coriander leaves
  • To save time, you can add the chillies and coriander leaves to the blender with the dry fruits and make it to a coarse paste
  • Dust your hands with cornflour and divide the curd mixture into 8 or 9 parts
  • Dust each part with a little cornflour. Make a small depression in the middle and add some of the dry fruit mixture into it and seal it shut
  • Pat it on both sides to make a circular flat tikki
  • Repeat the process till you have 8-9 stuffed tikkis ready for frying
  • Heat 2-3 tbsp ghee in a pan and then simmer the gas
  • Add the tikkis and fry them in batches or all at once depending on the size of your pan
  • After a minute or so, use a spatula and lift the tikki off the pan to ensure it does not stick on it
  • Turn the tikki over after 3-4 minutes and fry the other side. Take the tikki from the pan once both sides are golden brown in colour
  • Serve with some mint chutney
  • Enjoy!

dsc_0466

This is my entry for the Cooking from Cookbook Challenge hosted by Srivalli.

IMG_0399-0