Sanna Polo | Konkani style Cabbage Dosa

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This is one of my favorite dishes for this month. This is a quick breakfast dish from the Konkani cuisine. Though it is a part of Maharashtra, Konkani cuisine has its own distinct flavours and style making it unique in itself. This is another cuisine, like Karnataka, which has many dosa style dishes, each tastier than the last.

This dosa is a simple rice and vegetable dosa. It can be made with cabbage, drumsticks, colcoasia leaves, drumstick leaves, etc. This is not a breakfast dish in Konkan but a dish that is served for lunch or dinner with dalithoy which is a Konkani dal. But if you ask me it is so flavorful that you can eat it as is. The husband and I did just that while my daughter had it with curds which is mostly because she just needs a reason to have curds. I have made these sanna polo a little larger than usual but they are usually a little over half of this size. Also I replaced half of the rice with millets because I wanted to try a healthier version. You can use either rice or a mix of millets and rice.

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Recipe adapted from here

Makes 6 large Sanna Polo

WHAT WE NEED

1/2 cup Raw rice

1/2 cup Millets (any type would do)

3 tbsp Grated coconut

2-3 Dried red chillies

1 small piece of tamarind

3/4 cup Shredded / finely chopped cabbage

1 small onion, finely chopped

2 tbsp Fresh coriander, finely chopped

Salt

Water

Oil

 

WHAT TO DO

  • Soak the rice and millets in warm water for 30-45 minutes
  • Drain the water and set aside
  • Add the rice, millets, coconut, red chillies, tamarind and salt to a blender jar
  • Blend until it is an almost smooth batter
  • Transfer the mixture to a vessel and add the cabbage, onion and fresh coriander
  • Heat a tava and drizzle some oil on it
  • Pour a ladle full of batter on the tava and spread it around gently to an almost circular shape
  • Drizzle some oil around the edges of the dosa
  • Let it cook on high flame for a minute or so till the top looks cooked
  • You can cover it with a lid to quicken the process
  • Disengage the dosa from the tava with a steel spatula and turn it over
  • Let it cook on high flame for 30 seconds to a minute till small brown spots began appearing on it
  • Take it off the heat and repeat the procedure with the rest of the batter
  • Serve warm with dal or curds
  • Enjoy!

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Rulavachi Bhakri | Mangalore style Rava Dosai

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I cannot believe how fast this month is passing by. When I began this mega marathon, I only had a rough draft of a list of dishes I wanted to make. I figured that dosais are easy and can be made on a day to day basis. I did not realise that so many of them were the soak and ferment kind but I managed. For some alphabets I just wrote down the first dish that came to mind just to complete the list. For R, I had written down Raagi dosai which I make frequently at home though I have never blogged about it. Then I chanced upon this amazing instant dosai from Mangalore and I knew it just had to be done.

This is a very flavorful and easy to make dosai which uses ingredients readily available at home. I did not want to blog about any more dosais from Karnataka but I figured that Mangalore cuisine is a separate category in itself as is Coorgi cuisine. So, it is technically not Karnataka dosai, right?

Click here for more recipes with Semolina / Rava

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Recipe adapted from here

Makes 5-6 Bhakris

WHAT WE NEED

1/2 cup Semolina / Rava

1/4 cup Whole wheat flour / Atta

2 tbsp Curds / Hung curds

2 tbsp Grated coconut

1-2 tbsp Finely chopped onion

1 tsp Finely chopped ginger

2 tsp Finely chopped fresh coriander

Salt

Water

Oil

 

WHAT TO DO

  • Mix the semolina, whole wheat flour and grated coconut in a bowl
  • Add the curds and make a thick paste
  • Add onion, coriander, ginger, salt and water to make a batter similar in consistency to an idli batter
  • Heat a tava and drizzle some oil
  • Pour a ladle full of batter and spread it around in a circular shape
  • The bhakri will be thick and not very spread-able
  • Drizzle some oil along the edges and let it cook on high flame for a minute or two
  • Once the top part looks cooked, use a steel spatula to disengage the bhakri from the tava and turn it over
  • Let it cook on medium flame for a minute
  • Take it off the tava and repeat the procedure for the rest of the batter
  • Serve warm with chutney or butter
  • Enjoy!

 

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Oodhalu Dose | Barnyard Millet Dosa

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The best things about dose from Karnataka are its names. They actually have ingredients like eerulli (onion) and oodhalu (barnyard millet) only to help people like me doing an A-Z marathon. I lucked out or what!

I have made millet dosais and idlis previously but I always added some rice along with it. But this recipe calls for only the millet and lentils with a little of beaten rice. So I was, in equal parts, intrigued and nervous as to how it would turn out. Thankfully I can say it turned out beautifully and the daughter liked it. Can’t ask for anything more!

For more Millet recipes, check out Millet Dosa, Millet Khichadi and Millet Kozhakattai

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Recipe from here

Makes 8-10 dose

WHAT WE NEED

1/2 cup Barnyard Millet / Kutharavali

3 tbsp Black skinless lentils / Urad dal

2 tbsp Beaten rice / Poha

1/4 tsp Fenugreek seeds / Vendhayam

Salt

Water

Oil

WHAT TO DO

  • Soak the millets, lentils and fenugreek seeds together in a bowl overnight
  • Soak the beaten rice for at least 30 minutes
  • Drain and set aside the water
  • Add all these ingredients along with salt to a mixer jar or grinder
  • Add sufficient water and grind to a smooth paste
  • You can use the water the millets were soaked in
  • Transfer the batter to a large bowl, cover it and set aside
  • Let the batter ferment for 7-8 hours
  • Once it is fermented it can be used or kept in the refrigerator for up to 4 days
  • To make dose – heat a tava
  • Once it is hot, pour a ladle full of batter on it and spread it in a circular motion
  • Drizzle some oil along the edges and let it cook for up to a minute on high flame
  • Once the edges start to brown, use a steel spatula to disengage the dose from the tava and turn it over
  • Lower the gas and let it cook for around 30 seconds
  • Take it off the gas and repeat the procedure for the rest of the batter
  • Serve warm with sambhar and / or chutney
  • Enjoy!

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Nei Dosai | Ghee Roast Dosa

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Thanks to my family and my maid, I have had to make multiple dosais in the same batter because they are kind of tired of it and we have just passed the halfway mark in this mega marathon. So I am having to think on my feet and try and club 2-3 dosais with the same batter to give them a break from dosais. So I picked this classic ghee (Nei in Tamizh) roast dosai which also is a family favorite. Yay! win win!

The ghee roast needs a reasonable amount of skill to perfect. It may not be an expert level dosai like rava dosai but I would not recommend beginners to try this either. The key to an awesome nei (ghee) roast dosai is for your to attain a crisp dosai, especially at the edges but at the same time not get too crisp that it breaks off in pieces. So it needs to be crisp at the outer part but needs to be reasonably soft towards the centre so that it can be folded like a roll without breaking and easily dunked into a bowl of hot sambhar. So the art is knowing how thin to spread it out, how much ghee to add, how to adjust the gas settings and most importantly when to start taking it off the tava. If it is your first time I would not recommend spreading the batter too thin because the chances of the dosai breaking is high. In that case you need to cook for half a minute on the other side as well. If you have spread it thin enough then cooking it on one side is sufficient to get a delightful tasty ghee dosai.

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Makes 4-5 dosais

WHAT WE NEED

1 cup Dosai batter

Water

Ghee

 

WHAT TO DO

  • The batter needs to be a little more runny than regular dosai batter in order to be able to spread it out thin enough
  • If you are using idli batter then you need to dilute it further to get the right consistency
  • Heat a tava and drizzle some ghee on it
  • Pour a ladle full of batter and spread it out thin ensuring there are no gaps in the batter spread out
  • Drizzle some ghee on top of the dosai and spread it across the dosai
  • Add few drops of ghee around the edges of the dosai
  • Let it cook for a minute on medium high flame
  • Once the edges are browned, use a steel spatula to disengage the dosai from the tava
  • If you see the inner side of the dosai is well cooked then you can take it off the gas and proceed with the next dosai
  • Else, turn over the dosai and cook for around 30 seconds on meduim high flame
  • Take it off the gas and repeat the process with the rest of the batter
  • Serve warm with sambhar and / or your favorite chutney
  • Enjoy!

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Lauki Chilla | Bottle Gourd Pancakes

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The Chilla is a very popular breakfast dish primarily because it is so quick and easy to make and makes for a hearty meal. When I was looking for pancake like dishes for L, I did not have many options. The chilla was on my mind ever since I began this marathon because if there isn’t one in a marathon about pancakes / dosais, it wouldn’t do justice to the theme. Then I looked for lauki and chilla and voila! Because there is a chilla with every ingredient. Don’t trust me? Try Google!

This is an instant breakfast dish and can be made in a jiffy. Just get all the ingredients together, mix and cook. You can’t ask for an easier dish, especially for a hectic weekday morning. I have never successfully made a besan chilla and so I usually fall back on the moong dal chilla. But this one turned out really soft and tasty, especially with the green chutney. So, that is a huge item ticked off the to-master checklist!!

For more Bottle Gourd recipes check out this Refreshing Juice and also this hearty Bottle Gourd Soup

For more recipes with chickpea flour check out these mint pakoras, nankhatais, bhajiya pav and stuffed snake gourd.

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Recipe from here

Makes 3-4 Chillas

WHAT WE NEED

1/3 cup Besan / Chickpea flour

1/4 cup Grated Bottle gourd / Lauki

3 tbsp Rava / Semolina

3 tbsp Curds

1/4 tsp Red chilly powder

1/4 tsp Asofoetida

1/4 tsp Turmeric powder

1/2 tsp Jeera / Cumin seeds

Salt

Oil

Water
WHAT TO DO

  • Mix the besan, bottle gourd, rava, curds, red chilly powder, asofoetida, turmeric powder and salt
  • Add water to make a thick batter
  • Heat a tava and drizzle some oil on it
  • Pour a ladle full of batter and spread it in a circular shape
  • Drizzle some oil on the sides of the chilla
  • Once it is cooked, 1-2 minutes, use a steel spatula to disengage the chilla from the tava and turn it over
  • After a minute, take it off the tava
  • Repeat the same procedure for the rest of the batter
  • Serve warm with ketchup and green chutney
  • Enjoy!

 

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Stuffed Idli

This series seems to be one of hasty phone pictures. History repeated itself, as it often does in my house, when the daughter and husband claimed to be so hungry that waiting even for a second was impossible. It is so weird that there are days when I have the meal ready way before time and they would take forever to come and eat while there are other days when all I need is 10 minutes to click few photos but they would rant and rave and gobble up the meal before I take out the camera.

Today’s dish for the theme of ‘Stuffed Dishes’ is the ubiquitous idli. Idli has undergone so many variations and modifications yet it manages to retain its traditional charm. I decided to use up the last few ladles of my idli batter and some leftover veggies in making this stuffed idly. The veggies were left over from the pasta I made few days ago and so had carrot,golden corn,mushroom and capsicum. Needless to say, I was rewarded with beaming faces and a clean refrigerator. What more to ask for?

Makes 8 idlis

2 cups Idli Batter

1/4 cup cooked vegetables of your choice

Oil

Water

WHAT TO DO

  • If you don’t have any cooked vegetables, then sauté whatever veggies you plan to stuff the idli with in some oil till they are almost done and set aside
  • Take a large pan / idli vessel / pressure cooker and fill it with some water and put it on the gas to medium low
  • Grease the idli moulds with little oil
  • Pour the idli batter to fill half of the idli mould
  • Put in the veggies on top of the idli batter and pour some additional batter to cover the veggies
  • Steam for 10 minutes and let is rest for another 5 minutes
  • Unmould and serve hot
  • Enjoy with your favourite chutney, sambhar or as is

NOTES

  1. I have tried this with multiple leftover dry veggies and all work. My favourite is the leftover masala from making masala dosas. They are very tasty when stuffed into the idli batter

This is my post for the Blogging Marathon under the theme, ‘Stuffed Dishes’.

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Creamy Carrot Sandwich

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I don’t know about you but in my house, the carrot gets a bit of a step-motherly treatment. I take it for granted, don’t give it too much of importance, use it as a filler in combination with other vegetables and its presence solely dependent on the quantity needed and never stopping to consider its feelings. Basically, it always plays a supporting role and never gets its due limelight.  So when I picked this theme of one vegetable in three ways, I figured it would be nice to hero the carrot for once.

Since the husband is travelling I am having a dairy overflow – too much curd and too much milk. So, I figured I could make some hung curd and have a fabulous sandwich with it. It turned out creamy and delicious with the daughter happily munching away and I have been patting my back ever since.

Serves 2

WHAT WE NEED

8 slices of bread

1 carrot, grated

Hung curd from 1/2 litre curd

1 tsp chilly powder / curry powder / mixed dried herbs

Butter to toast the bread

Salt

 

WHAT TO DO

  • Toast the bread slices with butter
  • In a bowl, mix together the hung curd, grated carrot, spice powder and salt
  • Apply the carrot mixture on a slice of bread generously and cover it with another slice
  • Repeat the same for the remaining bread slices
  • Enjoy!

 

NOTES

  1. Though it is not mandatory to toast the bread, it is recommended because the bread otherwise is unable to hold it together and gets soggy due to the hung curd

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This is my post for the Blogging Marathon under the theme, ‘One vegetable three ways’.

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Cheese Masala Dosai

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The biggest difference I find between my previous working for a corporate self versus working for the home is that I used to crave for weekends then and now I absolutely dread them. I had Monday morning blues then and now I have Friday night chills. I simply can’t wait for the Monday morning when I can pack up the husband and daughter and let out a relieved sigh. The biggest worry for the weekend is to balance everyone’s taste and health, manage to spend time with them and also manage some respite for me. Not easy I tell you.

So this dish happened in one of the weekends when I wanted to eat masala dosai but had no potatoes or patience to make one. So I simply chopped up some onion, tomatoes and capsicum, topped it with loads of cheese and was rewarded with pleas for seconds and satisfied sighs. Miracles happen!

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Serves 2-3

WHAT WE NEED

3 cups Dosai batter

1 large onion

1 large tomato

1 large capsicum

2-3 green chillies

1 sprig curry leaves, finely chopped

2 tsp oil + for making dosais

Lots of shredded cheese

Salt

WHAT TO DO

  • Finely chop the onion, tomato and capsicum
  • Heat 2 tsp oil in a small pan
  • Add the green chillies and onion, tomato and capsicum and mix well
  • Add salt and let it cook till it is cooked well and the liquid from the tomato has almost dried out
  • Set aside
  • Heat a tava and pour a ladle full of batter on it
  • Spread it in concentric motion and make into a dosai
  • Add oil to the end of the dosai and let it cook
  • Add one spoon of the onion mixture on top of the dosai and spread it
  • Top it with as much shredded cheese as you want
  • Use the spatula to loosen the dosai and fold it into three
  • Repeat with the rest of the batter
  • Serve warm
  • Enjoy!

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This is my post for the Blogging Marathon under the theme, ‘One protein three dishes’

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Moong Dal Chilla

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My mother turned 60 a couple of months ago and to celebrate the occasion we went for a family lunch to this small but amazing restaurant called Swati Snacks in Mumbai. Every item on the menu was so delicious that we ordered quite a few of them multiple times. One of those dishes was this thin, crispy, buttery moong dal chilla. When I asked them about it, the restaurant guys insisted it had nothing but moong dal and it alone could result in a crispy crepe. I had two reasons to be suspicious – one, I am a typical South Indian and for me, lentil based crepes are thick and massive like ‘adai’ and secondly, I did try having besan chills and it did not work for me. Maybe I didn’t do it right but even after multiple attempts the husband refused to eat it and for once, I couldn’t fault him.

Then I figured I would try the moong dal chills. I mean, what was the worst that could happen? So I soaked some split moong dal and blended it with some salt and ginger. Voila, the results were fabulous. Then the next time I tried, I had some sour curd which I thought I could use up in this batter and the dosas were soft and delicious. So thanks to the people at Swathi Snacks for that amazing chilla and though mine isn’t as good, I still get a tasty and easy breakfasts dish on the menu.

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Makes around 8-10 chillas

WHAT WE NEED

Split moong dal 1 cup

Ginger, grated 1/4 tsp

Sour curds 1-2 tbsp

Water

Salt

Oil

WHAT TO DO

  • Soak the moong dal in water for around 3 hours. If you are in a hurry, then you can soak it in hot water for 1/2 hour.
  • Drain the water and set aside
  • Add the moong dal in the blender / mixer
  • Add the ginger and salt and enough water to make a smooth batter
  • Transfer the batter to a vessel.
  • The batter should be smooth and not very thick. It needs to be slightly thinner than the regular dosa batter but not too runny
  • Heat a tava and once it is hot, pour a ladle full of batter on it
  • Spread the batter with the back of the ladle to form a thin circular shape
  • Pour a little oil around the edges and let it cook for almost a minute on high flame
  • Once it is nearly cooked on the top side, lower the flame and use a spatula to gently separate the chilla from the tava
  • Once it comes off fully from the tava, turn it over to cook on the other side
  • Leave it on the tava for about 30 seconds on low flame
  • Repeat the process till you have made as many chillas as you need
  • Serve warm with some paneer bhurji and green coriander chutney
  • Enjoy!

NOTES

  1. You can also add some finely chopped onions and fresh coriander to the batter or to the chilla once it has been poured on to the tava
  2. Leave out the curds if you want a crisp chilla and add a little more curd for a softer chilla.

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This is my post for the Blogging Marathon under the theme, ‘Crepes’.

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Peanut Porridge

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I just finished a mega marathon of Protein Rich Dishes but I am clearly not over it. My theme for today is ‘Dishes from the Caribbean’ and what do I pick? Another protein packed dish. This one is so simple and delicious, not to mention easy to make with most ingredients readily available in your kitchen. It is a breakfast dish but I had it for lunch and felt content for the next 4-5 hours. This is surely getting into my breakfast roster.

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This peanut porridge is popular across all of the Caribbean. It started out as street food and is very popular with vegetarians. It has now gained popularity at restaurants with locals and tourists alike. There are different versions to make it – with condensed milk, evaporated milk or coconut milk.

Recipe adapted from here

Serves 1-2

WHAT WE NEED

Quick cooking Oats                            1/2 cup

Raw peanuts                                        1/2 cup

Wheat flour                                           2 tsp

Cornmeal                                               1 tbsp

Condensed milk                                    2-3 tbsp

Ground cinnamon                                1/2 tsp

Ground nutmeg                                     1/2 tsp

Water                                                       1 1/2 – 2 cups

A pinch of Salt 
WHAT TO DO

  • Heat 1 cup of water with a pinch of salt 
  • Grind the peanuts in to a fine powder and set aside
  • Grind the oats into a fine powder
  • Mix the ground oats and peanuts in a bowl
  • Add the cornmeal and wheat flour and mix well
  • Add 1 cup of water and stir to form a smooth paste
  • Pour this paste into the boiling water and mix well to ensure there are no lumps
  • Simmer and let it cook covered for 6-7 minutes
  • Stir frequently to avoid the porridge sticking to the base of the vessel
  • Add the condensed milk, nutmeg and cinnamon 
  • Mix and simmer for 2 minutes
  • Serve warm with some fruits for a wholesome tasty breakfast
  • Enjoy!

NOTES

  1. If you only want a mild sweetness to your porridge, add 2 tbsp of condensed milk else add 3 tbsp
  2. The porridge will be slightly runny immediately after cooking but will thicken when let to cool
  3. You can replace the water with part milk 

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This is my post for the Blogging Marathon under the theme, ‘Dishes from the Carribean’.

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