Quinoa Dosai

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No prizes for guessing the dosai for today. Q has too few options to debate over and so quinoa is a foregone conclusion. Usually I make quinoa dosai with rice flour and little wheat flour and the results are quite good. But this time I had some batter leftover after yesterday’s Patishapta Pitha and so I decided to modify that to make this Quinoa dosai.

There are primarily two popular ways to make dosais with varied flours. One is to mix rice flour with it and the other is to mix semolina. There are few other ways but you can safely mix any flour you have with either rice flour or rava and make tasty dosais. If you add curd along with the rava then the results are a soft dosai in the centre and a crisp edge.

You can click here to make a nearly perfect rava dosai

For more recipes with quinoa flour check out Quinoa Chocolate Mug Brownie and Multigrain Fougasse

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Makes 8-9 dosais

WHAT WE NEED

1/3 cup Quinoa flour

1/4 cup Semolina / Rava

3 tbsp All purpose flour

Water

Oil

Salt

WHAT TO DO

  • Mix the quinoa flour, semolina, all purpose flour and salt in a bowl
  • Add sufficient water to make a runny batter similar in consistency to a rava dosai batter
  • Heat a tava and drizzle a little oil on it
  • Keep the gas in high flame
  • Take a ladle full of batter and spread it on the tava. It will spread in a lacey pattern
  • If there are large gaps in the dosai then fill it with a little batter
  • Spread a little oil around the edges
  • Once the edges start turning brown use a steel spatula to disengage the dosai from the tava and turn it over
  • Turn the gas to simmer and let the dosai cook for 30 seconds
  • Take it off the tava and repeat the procedure for the rest of the batter
  • Serve warm with chutney or sambhar
  • Enjoy!

NOTES

  1. You can add finely chopped onions, coriander, pepper, etc. just like a rava dosai

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Patishapta Pitha

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Today I have a lip smacking dish all the way from the eastern part of India, West Bengal. I like to repeat that the mega marathon of this kind pushes you to look beyond your comfort zone and find some unique dishes from places you never expected to see. I never thought I would blog about a crepe / dosai kind of dish from Eastern India and now I have three and counting. The husband has spent around 8 years living there and so he is a self proclaimed expert on all things Bengal. I managed to raise his eyebrows too. If that is not an achievement I don’t know what is. Okay, I know but this is an achievement too, right?

Patishapta Pitha is a light and soft crepe made with all purpose flour, semolina and sugar and the most delightful part of it is the filling which is sweetened khoya or pal gova (in Tamizh). I read the recipe a few times to confirm the filling and to be honest, it makes for a wonderful snack or a unique desert. The husband and daughter have been making puppy eyes in a bid to get an unending supply of these pithas. Ha!

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Recipe adapted from here

Makes 8-10 pithas

WHAT WE NEED

130 gms All purpose flour

85 gms Semolina

80 gms Sugar

100 gms Unsweetened Khoya

500 ml Milk

Ghee / Clarified butter

Water

 

WHAT TO DO

For the filling

  • Heat the milk in a heavy bottom pan till it comes to a boil
  • Reduce the gas to simmer and let it reduce to half the quantity
  • Stir the milk at frequent intervals and remove the cream stuck to the sides of the vessel and add to the boiling milk
  • After it has reduced to half or less than half of the original volume, add the khoya and 50 gms sugar and mix well
  • Stir continuously if on a high flame else stir frequently
  • Once the mixture reaches a semi solid consistency turn off the gas and let it cool slightly
  • It will thicken further even after turning off the gas

For the pitha

  • Mix the all purpose flour, semolina and balance 30 gms sugar with sufficient water to make a thick batter
  • The batter should be in the consistency of a regular dosai batter
  • Heat a tava and once it is hot, spread a little ghee on it
  • Pour a ladle full of batter and spread it into a circular shape
  • Add a large spoonful of the filling at one end of the pitha in a straight line
  • Disengage the pitha from the tava with a steel spatula and roll it starting from the side where the filling is kept
  • Once rolled, keep turning it every 20 seconds on either side till it turns golden brown
  • You can add a few drops of ghee to fasten the process
  • Take it off the heat and repeat the procedure with the rest of the batter
  • Serve warm
  • Enjoy!

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NOTES

  1. If you do not have khoya, add another 500ml of milk to make the filling. It will take much longer (around 2 hours) to complete the process
  2. You can replace this filling with a mixture of grated coconut and jaggery
  3. If you do not want it to be too sweet, reduce the sugar in the pitha by 10gms
  4. This dish can be enhanced by serving it with some sweetened condensed milk

 

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Oodhalu Dose | Barnyard Millet Dosa

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The best things about dose from Karnataka are its names. They actually have ingredients like eerulli (onion) and oodhalu (barnyard millet) only to help people like me doing an A-Z marathon. I lucked out or what!

I have made millet dosais and idlis previously but I always added some rice along with it. But this recipe calls for only the millet and lentils with a little of beaten rice. So I was, in equal parts, intrigued and nervous as to how it would turn out. Thankfully I can say it turned out beautifully and the daughter liked it. Can’t ask for anything more!

For more Millet recipes, check out Millet Dosa, Millet Khichadi and Millet Kozhakattai

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Recipe from here

Makes 8-10 dose

WHAT WE NEED

1/2 cup Barnyard Millet / Kutharavali

3 tbsp Black skinless lentils / Urad dal

2 tbsp Beaten rice / Poha

1/4 tsp Fenugreek seeds / Vendhayam

Salt

Water

Oil

WHAT TO DO

  • Soak the millets, lentils and fenugreek seeds together in a bowl overnight
  • Soak the beaten rice for at least 30 minutes
  • Drain and set aside the water
  • Add all these ingredients along with salt to a mixer jar or grinder
  • Add sufficient water and grind to a smooth paste
  • You can use the water the millets were soaked in
  • Transfer the batter to a large bowl, cover it and set aside
  • Let the batter ferment for 7-8 hours
  • Once it is fermented it can be used or kept in the refrigerator for up to 4 days
  • To make dose – heat a tava
  • Once it is hot, pour a ladle full of batter on it and spread it in a circular motion
  • Drizzle some oil along the edges and let it cook for up to a minute on high flame
  • Once the edges start to brown, use a steel spatula to disengage the dose from the tava and turn it over
  • Lower the gas and let it cook for around 30 seconds
  • Take it off the gas and repeat the procedure for the rest of the batter
  • Serve warm with sambhar and / or chutney
  • Enjoy!

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Nei Dosai | Ghee Roast Dosa

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Thanks to my family and my maid, I have had to make multiple dosais in the same batter because they are kind of tired of it and we have just passed the halfway mark in this mega marathon. So I am having to think on my feet and try and club 2-3 dosais with the same batter to give them a break from dosais. So I picked this classic ghee (Nei in Tamizh) roast dosai which also is a family favorite. Yay! win win!

The ghee roast needs a reasonable amount of skill to perfect. It may not be an expert level dosai like rava dosai but I would not recommend beginners to try this either. The key to an awesome nei (ghee) roast dosai is for your to attain a crisp dosai, especially at the edges but at the same time not get too crisp that it breaks off in pieces. So it needs to be crisp at the outer part but needs to be reasonably soft towards the centre so that it can be folded like a roll without breaking and easily dunked into a bowl of hot sambhar. So the art is knowing how thin to spread it out, how much ghee to add, how to adjust the gas settings and most importantly when to start taking it off the tava. If it is your first time I would not recommend spreading the batter too thin because the chances of the dosai breaking is high. In that case you need to cook for half a minute on the other side as well. If you have spread it thin enough then cooking it on one side is sufficient to get a delightful tasty ghee dosai.

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Makes 4-5 dosais

WHAT WE NEED

1 cup Dosai batter

Water

Ghee

 

WHAT TO DO

  • The batter needs to be a little more runny than regular dosai batter in order to be able to spread it out thin enough
  • If you are using idli batter then you need to dilute it further to get the right consistency
  • Heat a tava and drizzle some ghee on it
  • Pour a ladle full of batter and spread it out thin ensuring there are no gaps in the batter spread out
  • Drizzle some ghee on top of the dosai and spread it across the dosai
  • Add few drops of ghee around the edges of the dosai
  • Let it cook for a minute on medium high flame
  • Once the edges are browned, use a steel spatula to disengage the dosai from the tava
  • If you see the inner side of the dosai is well cooked then you can take it off the gas and proceed with the next dosai
  • Else, turn over the dosai and cook for around 30 seconds on meduim high flame
  • Take it off the gas and repeat the process with the rest of the batter
  • Serve warm with sambhar and / or your favorite chutney
  • Enjoy!

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Mysore Masala Dosai

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I am sure there is hardly anyone who would not have tasted the classic exquisite Mysore Masala Dosai. It is one of the most popular dishes for any meal of the day and is enjoyed by people across the country. I was initially skeptical about choosing this one for the alphabet M as against other options like Meeta Chilla or Magge Polo or Mosaru Avalakkai Dose. But I figured it would be sacrilege if I did not include this classic dish in a dosai marathon and so here it is.

The main difference between the regular masala dosa and Mysore masala dosa is the bright red colour chutney in the latter. The chutney gives the Mysore dosa its unique taste. I love this one and have it whenever I eat out in a South Indian restaurant though I skip the masala and have just the dosa with the spicy red chutney.

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Recipe from here

Makes 4-5 dosas

WHAT WE NEED

2 cups Dosai batter

1 1/2 – 2 cups Potato masala for dosais

For the chutney

2 tsp Oil

1 Small onion, chopped

3-4 Garlic cloves

3-4 Dried red chillies

2 tbsp Channa dal / Bengal gram

1 tbsp Grated coconut (optional)

Salt

Water

 

WHAT TO DO

For the red chutney

  • Heat the oil and add the dried red chillies and Bengal gram
  • Chop the garlic and add them
  • Add the onion and saute for 3-4 minutes till the onions are transluscent
  • Take it off the heat and transfer it to a mixer jar
  • Add coconut (if using) and salt
  • Add enough water to make it a fine paste
  • The chutney should be of a spreadable consistency and so add water accordingly

For the assembly

  • Make as many dosais as you need with the batter
  • Spread the red chutney on the inside of the dosai evenly
  • Add a large dollop of the potato masala
  • Fold the dosai and serve it warm with some sambhar and coconut chutney
  • Enjoy!

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Lauki Chilla | Bottle Gourd Pancakes

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The Chilla is a very popular breakfast dish primarily because it is so quick and easy to make and makes for a hearty meal. When I was looking for pancake like dishes for L, I did not have many options. The chilla was on my mind ever since I began this marathon because if there isn’t one in a marathon about pancakes / dosais, it wouldn’t do justice to the theme. Then I looked for lauki and chilla and voila! Because there is a chilla with every ingredient. Don’t trust me? Try Google!

This is an instant breakfast dish and can be made in a jiffy. Just get all the ingredients together, mix and cook. You can’t ask for an easier dish, especially for a hectic weekday morning. I have never successfully made a besan chilla and so I usually fall back on the moong dal chilla. But this one turned out really soft and tasty, especially with the green chutney. So, that is a huge item ticked off the to-master checklist!!

For more Bottle Gourd recipes check out this Refreshing Juice and also this hearty Bottle Gourd Soup

For more recipes with chickpea flour check out these mint pakoras, nankhatais, bhajiya pav and stuffed snake gourd.

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Recipe from here

Makes 3-4 Chillas

WHAT WE NEED

1/3 cup Besan / Chickpea flour

1/4 cup Grated Bottle gourd / Lauki

3 tbsp Rava / Semolina

3 tbsp Curds

1/4 tsp Red chilly powder

1/4 tsp Asofoetida

1/4 tsp Turmeric powder

1/2 tsp Jeera / Cumin seeds

Salt

Oil

Water
WHAT TO DO

  • Mix the besan, bottle gourd, rava, curds, red chilly powder, asofoetida, turmeric powder and salt
  • Add water to make a thick batter
  • Heat a tava and drizzle some oil on it
  • Pour a ladle full of batter and spread it in a circular shape
  • Drizzle some oil on the sides of the chilla
  • Once it is cooked, 1-2 minutes, use a steel spatula to disengage the chilla from the tava and turn it over
  • After a minute, take it off the tava
  • Repeat the same procedure for the rest of the batter
  • Serve warm with ketchup and green chutney
  • Enjoy!

 

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Khura |Buckwheat Pancakes

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After yesterday’s sizzling street food magic of Mumbai, we are back to more traditional recipe. During one of my more experimental days, I had made a spicy version of the Neer dose and actually managed to find time to click pictures too. I was desperately trying to fit it in somewhere during this month but like I said, my blog would turn into a Karnataka tourism brochure. So I have filed it away in my magic folder for now to be used later when it would be more desperately needed. And if you know me, that will be very soon.

Today’s dish is from the state of Arunachal Pradesh. This is my favorite part of the mega marathon when we discover similarly structured dishes across cuisines and states. The khura is a nearly instant kind of dosa made with buckwheat flour. I have blogged about too many rice based dosais that this break from it will be a good one. Also, as luck would have it, I had just the right amount of buckwheat flour in my refrigerator which needed to be done with.  Usually the khura is simply the mixture of buckwheat flour, water and salt. But I had a small amount of finely chopped veggies that needed to finished and so added it too.

Check out other recipes with Buckwheat flour – Ajdov Kruh and Chia Seed Cookies.

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Makes 10 mini pancakes

WHAT WE NEED

1/2 cup Buckwheat flour

2 tbsp Finely chopped vegetables (optional)

Salt

Water

Oil

 

WHAT TO DO

  • Mix the buckwheat flour and salt with enough water to make a thick pancake like batter
  • Set aside for 30 minutes
  • Add the vegetables and mix well
  • Heat a tava and drizzle some oil on it
  • Pour small ladles of batter to make mini pancakes
  • Let them be thick and not too thin
  • Once the edges start to brown turn it over using a spatula
  • After a minute take it off the heat
  • Serve warm
  • Enjoy!

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Jini Dosa

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When I posted the Farali Dosa few days ago, I spoke about the option of a French fries dosa. Surprisingly many of my blogging friends expressed an interest in it. I am yet to come to terms with that travesty but I thought it would be a good idea to include at least one dosa from the street food scene of Mumbai. Most of the options I found were cheese dosa and schezwan dosa but I had other nicer options for those alphabets and so I discarded them. Then I came across this Jini dosa which sounded a lot more interesting than the Javversi (Sago) dosai I had otherwise planned.

To be honest, I haven’t tasted this dosa in the streets of Mumbai despite living there for over 25 years. It could be because I thought it a waste to eat dosa out when it was so easily available at home and when the alternative was an array of chaats. Jini dosa is a kind of masala dosa which doesn’t use too much of potatoes. It is a combination of veggies like cabbage, capsicum, carrots with schezwan sauce and tomato ketchup and topped with loads of cheese. The veggies are semi cooked on top of the dosa itself and retain a slight crunch.

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Makes 4-5 dosas

WHAT WE NEED

2 cups of dosa batter

3/4 cup chopped vegetables

2 tbsp Schezwan sauce

2-3 tbsp Tomato ketchup

1-2 tbsp Chilly sauce (optional)

2 tbsp Butter

Grated cheese

Oil

WHAT TO DO

  • Mix all the vegetables in a bowl
  • Heat a tava and spread a little oil on it
  • Pour a ladle full of batter and spread it in a circular shape
  • Keep the gas on simmer for the dosa to cook slowly
  • Once the top part of the dosa is slightly cooked, add 2 tbsp of vegetables, 1 tsp of schezwan, 2 tsp of tomato ketchup and 1/2 tsp of chilly sauce
  • Mix well and spread it on the dosa with a spatula or potato masher
  • Cover and let cook for 2-3 minutes
  • Top it with grated cheese
  • Cut the dosa into 4-5 parts with a pizza cutter or knife
  • Roll each part into a roll
  • Serve warm with ketchup or chutney
  • Enjoy!

NOTES

  1. I used cabbage, carrot, capsicum, green peas and sweet corn. You can use any or all of these or potatoes, tomatoes,spring onions,etc.

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Inji Thokku Dosai | Ginger Pickle Dosai

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So here we are on the 9th day of this marathon and my family’s enthusiasm for dosais has begun to wane. Also, my maid has started sighing and rolling her eyes when she sees the grinder / mixer in the sink to be washed every alternate day. So now I have to figure out different dosais to make with the same batter in order to run the rest of the marathon. I tried explaining the concept of mega marathon to my maid who asked if I couldn’t have made the dosais in advance. Well, I definitely need to start preparing for the mega marathons in advance.

The idea for this recipe is from my sister-in-law. She and her roommates would make these simple quick dosais for breakfast or dinner on days they had too much work and too less time. This is a simple idea of mixing pickle with dosai batter and making delicious crisp dosais which does not need any side dish and can be had on the go. So when I was stuck with trying to find a dish for ‘I’, my eyes fell on the delicious ginger pickle sitting on the counter and thus was born the Inji Thokku dosai. If you are in Chennai, do pick up all the pickles / thokku from the Ganga Sweets chain. They have a lovely range and are super delicious. Luckily they have an outlet near our house in Chennai and the husband and I make a mandatory trip to their shop to stock up on sweets, savories and pickles to last till our next Chennai trip.

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Makes 5-6 dosais

WHAT WE NEED

2 cups Idli / Dosai batter

1 tbsp Ginger pickle (or any other pickle of your choice)

Oil / Ghee

Water

 

WHAT TO DO

  • Add the thokku / pickle to the dosai batter and mix well
  • Add water if needed to bring it to the right consistency
  • Heat a tava and pour a ladle full of batter on it
  • Spread the batter into a circular shape
  • The thinner you spread the batter, the crispier it will be
  • Drizzle some oil or ghee on the sides of the dosai
  • Once the edges start to brown, use a steel spatula to disengage the dosai from the tava and turn it over
  • If you have spread it very thin, you need to be very careful else the dosai will break
  • After 30 seconds or so, take the dosai off the tava
  • Repeat the procedure for the rest of the batter
  • Serve warm as is or with a chutney of your choice
  • Enjoy!

 

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Heerekai Sippe Dose | Ridge Gourd Peel Dosai

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There are so many dosais in Karanataka that it’s astounding. When I first made my list of dosais for this month it seemed more like a Karnataka tourism promotion rather than dosais from across the country. So I reduced the number of dosais from the state but there are still so many unique and amazing dosais that simply had to be included.

Today’s dose is made with ridge gourd peel, coconut and chillies. The only time needed is to soak the rice. Then it is simply grind and cook and eat. It is also a lovely way to get kids to eat ridge gourd.

Recipe adapted from here

Makes 6-8 doses

WHAT WE NEED

1/2 cup Idli rice

Peel of 1 ridge gourd

2-3 tbsp grated coconut

1-2 Dried red chillies

1 small piece of jaggery

1/2 tsp Tamarind extract

2 tbsp peanuts (optional)

1/2 tsp Cumin seeds

1/4 tsp Coriander seeds

Salt

Oil / Ghee to make dose

Water

WHAT TO DO

  • Soak the idli rice in water for 4-5 hours or overnight
  • Drain the water and transfer the rice to a mixer
  • Grind it to a coarse paste
  • Add the ridge gourd peel, coconut, dried red chillies, jaggery, cumin seeds, coriander seeds and salt
  • Add sufficient water to grind it to a smooth paste
  • Heat a tava
  • Once it is hot, pour a ladle full of batter on it and spread it to a circular shape
  • Drizzle oil at the edges of the dose
  • After 1-2 minutes, use a steel spatula to disengage the dose from the tava and turn it over
  • After 1-2 minutes take the dose from the tava
  • Repeat the procedure for the rest of the batter
  • Serve warm with sambhar or chutney
  • Enjoy!

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