Moroccan Roasted Carrot Soup

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The weather is Bangalore is amazing this time of the year. It is cold enough to want to have tea and hot, deep fried snacks all the time but not too cold that you need multiple layers of clothes. It is perfect weather for a soup and I had some carrots which had to be used at the earliest. I roasted them with some onions and garlic and blended it with some roasted cumin and the results were delicious to say the least. It is the perfect recipe for a lazy day meal because you get rather tasty results with minimal efforts.

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Recipe adapted from here

Serves 2-3

WHAT WE NEED

3 carrots, medium to large

1 onion, large

5-6 garlic cloves

2 tbsp olive oil

1 tsp roasted cumin seeds

2-3 cups water / veg stock

Salt & pepper

WHAT TO DO

  • Preheat the oven to 200C
  • Cut the onion, carrots and garlic into large chunks and transfer them to a oven safe dish
  • Sprinkle with salt and pepper and mix in the olive oil
  • Bake for 30-40 minutes till the carrots start shrinking
  • Blend the carrots, onion and garlic with roasted cumin
  • Transfer the mixture to a vessel and add the vegetable stock / water
  • Let it come to a boil and turn off the gas
  • Serve hot with some bread
  • Enjoy!

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This is my post for the Blogging Marathon for the theme, ‘Moroccan Cuisine’.

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Khobz dyal Zraa’ – Moroccan Wheat Bread

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Another awesome part of baking bread is the scoring of the dough before baking. Scoring is simply slashing the dough top so that we are able to control where the bread expands from. When you score the bread with a pretty design it adds a delightful artistic side to the loaf, a treat to the eyes and you are in awe of it even before biting into the first slice. Though it appears easy, scoring requires a little confidence and quite a bit of practice. The tool used to score dough is called lame and it is basically a regular blade mounted on a stand. As usual, this is not available in India and so I fashioned myself one in order to be able to score the dough well. This is my first effort with my new tool and it doesn’t look too bad for a first attempt, right? Despite a slightly misshapen loaf, that is.

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Bread is an integral part of Moroccan cuisine and they have a wide variety of breads, both dough raising and flat breads. I picked the whole wheat bread which has an equal amount of whole wheat and all purpose flour. This bread is a relatively flat bread and needs only one rise which makes it a comparatively faster bake. But because of the low hydration, the air pockets are not huge but small and uniform throughout.

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Recipe adapted from here

Makes 1 large loaf

WHAT WE NEED

135 gms All purpose flour

135 gms Whole wheat flour

1 1/2 tsp Instant yeast

180 gms Warm water

1 tsp Salt

1 tbsp Oil

1 tbsp Honey

 

WHAT TO DO

  • Mix the all purpose flour, whole wheat flour and salt together
  • Make a well in the middle and add the yeast
  • Add the oil, honey and water to the yeast and mix it first
  • Then mix with the flours to form a dough
  • Knead for 6-7 minutes till you get a soft pliable dough
  • Set aside for 15 minutes
  • Grease a baking tray and sprinkle some semolina
  • Press down the dough with the palm of your hand to make a 1/4″ thick circle
  • Cover with a kitchen towel and set aside for 1 hour
  • Preheat the oven at 250C
  • Sprinkle some flour on top and slash the dough in any pattern of your choice
  • Put the dough into the oven and reduce the temperature to 220C
  • Bake for 10 minutes
  • Turn the tray around and bake for another 10 minutes or till the loaf acquires a rich brown colour
  • Take it out of the oven and cool on a rack
  • Enjoy!

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This is my post for the Blogging Marathon under the theme, ‘Moroccan Cuisine’.

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This is part of the Bake-a-thon 2017

Moroccan Zaalouk

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We try and explore the cuisine of a different country each month in our Blogging Marathon and I try to take up the theme, if only to bake a new kind of bread from a new country every month. This month’s cuisine is Moroccon and as I was browsing through various recipes, I realised how similar it is with Indian cuisine. I found this recipe for an eggplant and tomato salad called Zaalouk which is quite similar to Baingan Bhartha made in India. Coincidentally the husband picked 2 large eggplants on his trip to the supermarket and I decided to kill multiple birds with one stone.

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This is a salad in Moroccan cuisine and is said to go very well with bread. I simply topped it on my toasted homemade bread and I have to tell you it is divine. I would have frowned on having baingan bartha for breakfast but this zaalouk with bread is a treat. The key difference between the two is the amount of tomatoes used in the dish. While we use 1 or 2 tomatoes for an entire eggplant, this dish calls for 3-4 making the taste significantly different, not to mention delicious.

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Recipe adapted from here

Serves 4-5 people

WHAT WE NEED

2 large Eggplants

5-6 Ripe tomatoes

4-5 Garlic cloves

1 tbsp Cumin seeds

1 tsp red chilly powder / paprika

Oil

Salt

Water

 

WHAT TO DO

  • Rub some oil on the eggplants, poke a few holes with a fork and roast them on high flame till they are cooked
  • Remove the skins and mash well
  • Heat 2-3 tsp of oil in a pan and add cumin seeds
  • Finely chop the garlic and add to the pan
  • Add finely chopped tomatoes and chilly powder and let cook for 5-6 minutes on low flame
  • Add the roasted eggplants and mix well
  • Add salt and a little water and simmer for 5-7 minutes
  • Garnish with fresh coriander and serve hot
  • Enjoy with some bread!

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This is my post for the Blogging Marathon under the theme, ‘Moroccan Cuisine’.

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Moroccon Style Chickpea Soup

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When I started the soup theme this month, my plan was to make more lentil, bean and grain soup so that I could replace my meals with them and spend lesser time in the kitchen. But I saw so many varieties of soups with different veggie combinations that I sidelined the grains and lentils and went after the veggies. So when I came across this recipe, I simply had to make it, especially since today is the penultimate day of the month long marathon.

This recipe is very similar to the Indian chole which is a regular accompaniment to rotis or puris or rice. It is a lot less spicy version and can be enjoyed with any flat bread of your choice. Mine was roti.

Serves 3

Recipe adapted from here

WHAT WE NEED

Chickpeas                                                         1 1/2 cups

Olive oil                                                             2 tbsp

Onion, finely chopped                                  1

Garlic, minced                                                 1 tsp

Freshly ground toasted cumin                  1 tsp

Chilly powder                                                  1/2 tsp

Sugar                                                                  1/2 tsp

Tomatoes, chopped                                       2

Vegetable stock                                              2 cups

Salt

Coriander leaves                                            to garnish

 

WHAT TO DO

  • Soak the chickpeas overnight and pressure cook them the next morning for 2-3 whistles till they are completely cooked
  • Heat the oil and add the garlic and onion and saute on low flame till the onion turns soft
  • Add powdered cumin and chilly powder and mix well
  • Add salt and vegetable stock and 1 cup of the chickpeas and bring to a boil
  • Mash the balance 1/2 cup of chickpeas with a potato masher or with your fingers to form a mushy mix
  • Add the balance chickpeas to the pan and mix well
  • Simmer for 12-15 minutes till the soup becomes slightly thick
  • Turn off the heat and adjust seasoning, if required
  • Garnish with coriander leaves and serve with any flatbread
  • Enjoy!

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This post is part of the September Mega Marathon under the theme – Soups.

Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing BM# 68