Creamy Carrot Sandwich

DSC_1221

I don’t know about you but in my house, the carrot gets a bit of a step-motherly treatment. I take it for granted, don’t give it too much of importance, use it as a filler in combination with other vegetables and its presence solely dependent on the quantity needed and never stopping to consider its feelings. Basically, it always plays a supporting role and never gets its due limelight.  So when I picked this theme of one vegetable in three ways, I figured it would be nice to hero the carrot for once.

Since the husband is travelling I am having a dairy overflow – too much curd and too much milk. So, I figured I could make some hung curd and have a fabulous sandwich with it. It turned out creamy and delicious with the daughter happily munching away and I have been patting my back ever since.

Serves 2

WHAT WE NEED

8 slices of bread

1 carrot, grated

Hung curd from 1/2 litre curd

1 tsp chilly powder / curry powder / mixed dried herbs

Butter to toast the bread

Salt

 

WHAT TO DO

  • Toast the bread slices with butter
  • In a bowl, mix together the hung curd, grated carrot, spice powder and salt
  • Apply the carrot mixture on a slice of bread generously and cover it with another slice
  • Repeat the same for the remaining bread slices
  • Enjoy!

 

NOTES

  1. Though it is not mandatory to toast the bread, it is recommended because the bread otherwise is unable to hold it together and gets soggy due to the hung curd

DSC_1222

This is my post for the Blogging Marathon under the theme, ‘One vegetable three ways’.

BMLogo

Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing this BM

Kimbula Banis | Sweet Buns

DSC_1236

My usual modus operandi in any country theme is to look for the breads available there and try to bake atleast one such dish. I chanced upon this awesome sweet bun recipe and knew I had to make it. It is simple, tasty and makes for a perfect snack for kids.

DSC_1239

 

This dish is supposed to look like a crocodile and hence the name ‘kimbula’ which means crocodile. So usually these buns are longer and bigger. But I wanted to give these for my daughter’s snack box and so made them smaller and figured these could work as baby kimbula rolls. What say?

DSC_1220

Recipe adapted from here

Makes 15-18 buns

WHAT WE NEED

170 gms All purpose flour

20 gms Milk powder

1 egg

4 gms Instant yeast

15 gms Brown sugar

25 gms Sugar + for sprinkling on top

12 gms Unsalted butter

65-70 gms Warm water

 

WHAT TO DO

  • Mix all the ingredients together, except water
  • Add the water slowly to form a soft and pliant dough
  • Knead for 2-3 minutes and keep covered in a bowl till it doubles in volume. It should take around 1 hour
  • Take out the dough and roll it with a rolling pin to a long rectangle
  • Cut the dough into small triangles with a dough scrapper or knife
  • Roll each triangle from the broad side to the narrow side
  • Line a baking tray with parchment
  • Transfer the rolled dough to the baking tray and set aside for half hour
  • Preheat the oven to 180C
  • Sprinkle sugar generously on top of the dough buns
  • Bake for 20 minutes or till the top is golden brown
  • Serve warm
  • Enjoy with some tea!

DSC_1265

This is my post for the Blogging Marathon under the theme, ‘Sri Lankan Cuisine’.

BMLogo

Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing this BM

Sourdough Banana & Zucchini Bread

DSC_1178

Another resolution I have is to improving my sourdough baking. I wanted to bake a sourdough bread loaf but the winter has been particularly cold this time and my starter is taking ages to show any signs of activity. So I ditched that idea and decided to bake a sourdough quick bread with bananas and zucchini. The oven spring in the loaf was awesome and we got a fabulously soft and delicious loaf. Do try it.

DSC_1179

Adapted from here

Makes one 9″ loaf

WHAT WE NEED

3 tbsp Unsalted butter, room temperature

1/2 cup Sugar

1 egg, beaten

1/4 cup Mashed bananas

1/2 cup Sourdough starter

1/2 tsp Vanilla

1 tsp Orange zest (Optional)

1 cup Whole wheat flour, sifted

1/2 tsp Baking powder

1/4 tsp Baking soda

1/4 tsp Ground cinnamon

1/4 tsp Ground Nutmeg

Pinch of salt

1/2 cup Tutti fruiti / nuts

1/2 cup Unpeeled, shredded zucchini

 

WHAT TO DO

  • Cream the butter and sugar till it is light and fluffy
  • Add the egg and beat into a smooth mixture
  • Stir in the mashed bananas, sourdough starter, orange zest and vanilla
  • Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, nutmeg and salt
  • Add the flour mixture to the sourdough mixture
  • Add the zucchini and tutti fruiti and mix together to form a batter
  • Grease a 9″ loaf pan and pour the batter into it
  • Set aside for 20 minutes
  • Preheat the oven at 175C
  • Bake for 45-50 minutes or till the toothpick comes out clean
  • Unmould the loaf and cool on a wire rack
  • Enjoy!

DSC_1203

This is my post for the Blogging Marathon under the theme, ‘New Year Challenges’.

BMLogo

Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing this BM

Pane di Lino / Ground Flaxseed Bread

DSC_1211

This is the first post for 2018 and I wanted it be a bread. This week I am posting three recipes for the New Year Challenge in which we post dishes that reflect our goals and resolutions for this year. Mine have to revolve around bread. So I will be posting three posts related to bread.

One of my resolutions has been to completely stop buying bread from the store. I have reached closer to that goal in the past six months. Now the husband and daughter have become more discerning and want variety in the bread though they were content with the same store bread for all these years. So I tried this wheat bran and ground flaxseed bread which has an amazing texture in the crumb and crust.

DSC_1227

Adapted from here

Makes one 9″ loaf

WHAT WE NEED

370 gms All purpose flour

25 gms Ground flaxseeds

10 gms Wheat bran

1 tsp Instant yeast

1 tsp Salt

300 gms Warm water

1 tsp Oil

WHAT TO DO

  • Mix all the ingredients together and form a wet dough
  • Cover and let it rest for an hour
  • Stretch and fold the dough on all sides and place it in the bowl seamside down
  • Cover and let it rise to double in volume which should take around 3-4 hours depending on the weather
  • Fold the dough over itself and let it rise again for 1-2 hours till you see it start rising again and increasing in volume
  • Take a Pullman loaf tin and grease the tin and cover with oil or butter
  • Take out the dough and shape it into a log
  • Transfer it to the loaf tin and cover with a cling wrap
  • Let it rise till the dough reaches nearly the top of the loaf tin which should take around 2-3 hours
  • Preheat the oven at 250C
  • Cover the tin with its lid and bake at 230C for 30 minutes
  • Reduce the temperature to 220C and bake for 15 minutes
  • Take out the pan and unmould the loaf from the tin
  • Let it cool completely on the wire rack before slicing it
  • Enjoy!

NOTES

  1. If you want to eat the bread as is without any butter, etc. then add another 1/2 tsp salt
  2. In hindsight I thought a darker colour on the crust would have been nicer. Maybe another 3-4 minutes in the oven would have achieved that

DSC_1237

This is my post for the Blogging Marathon under the theme, ‘New Year Challenges’.

BMLogo

Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing this BM

Bake-a-thon Round Up

We come to the end of another Bake-a-thon, which is my favourite event of the year because I have legitimate reason to mix flour water salt and yeast and get all excited and worked up at the same time. My original plan was to have all recipes in this theme as sourdough baking but I am guessing I still have sometime to go before I can be competent and confident enough to publish those efforts.

So this time is about breads – sourdough and yeast breads, not to mention yeast water breads.

Here is a recap –

1. Raisin Yeast Water Bread

2. Rosemary Fougasse

3. White Bread

4. Cornell Bread

5. Sourdough Brown Bread

6. Pullman Loaf

7. Apple Yeast Water Bread

8. Khobz Dyal Zraa’

9. Whole Wheat Bran & Seeded Bread

10. Roasted Garlic & Potato Bread

11. Crusty Cloche Bread with Maize Flour

12. Cinnamon Rolls

13. New Year’s Eve Pizza with Cauliflower Crust

Happy Baking!

New year’s eve Pizza with Cauliflower Crust

DSC_1160

This will be the final recipe for the year 2017. I will save the disbelief for the year having gone past quickly for another post. I have been wanting to make a pizza for this Bake-a-thon but I never got around it. The main reason was that I happened to visit 3 Italian restaurants in a span of 10 days and if I dared to make pizza after that run, I knew I would be seriously injured or maimed. But then finally I hit upon this idea and it call came together very well.

DSC_1165

I chanced upon this recipe for New Year’s Eve Pizza and thought it would be a wonderful way to end the year. The best part about it is that the pizza is topped with bread crumbs mixed with olive oil giving it a lovely crunch and crisp top. I had some bread frozen because my experiments did not turn out too well and no one wanted to have it. So I have been pulsing them and using as bread crumbs. I figured I could use up some of that too with this recipe. Then I remembered I had a large head of cauliflower waiting to be used. So I mixed the bread crumb topping with cauliflower crust and voila, we have this awesome pizza that works perfectly well when it comes to clearing out my refrigerator.

DSC_1176

Makes one 11″ pizza

WHAT WE NEED

1 kg Cauliflower

60 gms Almonds

3 tbsp Chia seeds

4 tbsp Water

1 tbsp Dried oregano

1 tsp Salt

Toppings per your choice

1/4 cup Bread crumbs

1-2 tbsp Olive oil

WHAT TO DO

  • Break the cauliflower into florets and blitz them in a food processor / mixer to form a rice like consistency
  • Transfer it to a microwave safe bowl
  • Cover with cling wrap and microwave for 8 minutes till softened
  • Transfer it to a kitchen towel and let cool for 10 minutes
  • Grind the chia seeds and mix it with water in a bowl and set aside
  • Squeeze out as much water as possible from the cauliflower through the kitchen towel
  • Transfer the cauliflower to a bowl
  • Grind almonds into rice like consistency
  • Add the almonds, chia seed mixture, oregano and salt to the cauliflower and get them together like a dough
  • Press into a greased baking tray at 1/4″ thick
  • Ensure that the thickness is the same overall without having highs and lows
  • Preheat the oven at 200C
  • Bake for 25-30 minutes till light brown
  • Take it out and let cool for 15-20 minutes
  • Preheat the oven at 250C
  • Add toppings to the pizza base as per your choice
  • Mix the bread crumbs and olive oil and sprinkle on top of the pizza covering it well
  • Bake at 220C for 10 minutes or till the top turns golden brown
  • If necessary, broil for 2-3 minutes
  • Serve hot
  • Enjoy!

 

NOTES

  1. The bread crumbs are optional and can be omitted if you wish
  2. Chia seeds can be substituted with flaxseeds
  3. If you do not want to microwave the cauliflower, then steam it for 8-9 minutes

DSC_1179

 

This is part of the Bake-a-thon 2017

Crusty Cloche Bread with Maize flour

DSC_1132

I have been trying to bake with different flours for sometime now. Not all experiments are successful but each is definitely a learning experience. I found some maize flour in my local supermarket quite suddenly one day. I knew that I should grab it before it disappears again and I did. I was not quite sure as to what I should make with it but I picked it up anyway. Even if I don’t get great breads with these different flours, I know I can always use them up to make dosai or rotis and so they won’t be wasted.

DSC_1142

Ever since I discovered crackling crusts can be made by covering the dough while baking, I have been to heaven. I love the crackling sound when I cut into the loaf and the texture it gives the crust. So when I chanced upon this recipe which has baking with a cloche and uses maize flour, it simply had to be done. Another interesting part of the recipe is that it needs no preheating and is baked in a cold oven. The only issue I faced was that the dough was too small and cloche too big and so it did not rise as much as I thought it would but nevertheless it was a delicious bread, more so when toasted with olive oil.

DSC_1152

Recipe adapted from here

Makes 1 medium loaf

WHAT WE NEED

200 gms All purpose flour

65 gms Maize flour

175 gms Warm water

1 tsp Instant yeast

3/4 tsp Salt

1 tbsp Olive oil

2 tsp garlic / onion powder / mixed dried herbs (optional)

 

WHAT TO DO

  • Mix all the ingredients to form a dough
  • Let it rise till double in volume
  • Shape the dough like a ball
  • Transfer to a baking tray and cover it with a cloche / any large oven safe bowl
  • Let it rise for 45 minutes or nearly double in volume
  • Sprinkle the dough with some flour and slash the top
  • Place the baking tray with the cloche covered in the cold oven
  • Bake covered for 30 minutes
  • Remove the cloche and bake uncovered for 10 minutes
  • Take it out of the oven and let cool completely on a wire rack
  • Enjoy!

DSC_1157

This is part of the Bake-a-thon 2017

Roasted Garlic and Potato Bread

DSC_1259

If you don’t know already, let me tell you that roasting garlic is one of the most amazing things you can do in the kitchen. It lets out a lovely aroma that delights the senses, works up your imagination and appetite and lends a wonderful flavour to the dish. So when I saw this awesome bread with roasted garlic and mashed potato, I knew I simply had to do it. It turned out so light and flavourful that even the daughter and husband were asking for seconds.

DSC_1225

It takes a little longer to make this bread because of the additional step of roasting garlic and mashing potatoes but it is definitely time well spent which rewards you with an amazing loaf. I have used all purpose flour for this loaf but you can replace upto 50% of it with whole wheat flour or other flour of your choice. But the bread will be denser than a loaf made entirely with all purpose flour.

DSC_1243

Adapted from New Artisan Bread in 5 Minutes

Makes one large loaf

460 gms All purpose flour

340 gms Warm water

1 1/2 tsp Instant yeast

2 tsp Salt

2 1/4 tsp Sugar

110 gms Mashed potatoes

1 garlic head

 

WHAT TO DO

  • Preheat the oven to 200C
  • Wrap the garlic head with its skin in foil and bake for 25-30 minutes
  • Take it out and squeeze out the garlic pulp and set aside
  • Mix the water, yeast, salt, sugar, mashed potatoes and garlic in a large bowl
  • Add the flour and mix it to ensure no dry flour remains
  • Cover and set aside till it rises and flattens or collapses, around 2 hours
  • Refrigerate for 2-3 hours
  • Take out the dough from the bowl and dust it with a little flour and shape into a ball
  • Let it rest for an hour
  • Preheat the oven to 250C
  • Sprinkle some flour and slash the top of the dough
  • Cover and bake for 20 minutes
  • Take the cover off and bake for 10 minutes
  • Unmould the loaf and let cool completely on a wire rack
  • Enjoy!

DSC_1245

 

This is part of the Bake-a-thon 2017

Whole Wheat Bran & Seeded Bread

DSC_1133

All my life, I have been a staunch supporter of all purpose flour when it comes to baking bread. It makes a lovely light loaf and easily beats all other flours in terms of taste. Call it destiny or old age, of late I have started enjoying whole wheat loaves a lot. I love the chewy texture and the flavour it brings along. Though I still maintain that the case against all purpose flour is mostly making a mountain of a molehill, whole wheat flour features a lot more in my breads these days.

DSC_1138

 

If you remember, I had written about how imperative it is for me to finish a pack of wheat bran that I had bought and forgotten. So I have been trying to add it to many bread loaves just to get done with it. I have significantly modified the whole wheat sandwich loaf recipe from the New Artisan Bread in 5 Minutes. So I figured this is a good loaf I could add bran to. I also topped it with some seeds to get the daughter to eat them. Both these ingredients are optional and the bran does make it a comparatively dense loaf but it is a healthier loaf and the little extra dense-ness is a small price to pay. Else it can be replaced by whole wheat flour. I forget about the dough during proofing and ended up over proofing it which can be seen in the loaf. So don’t do that and bake the loaf at the appropriate time.

 

DSC_1142

Makes one 8″ loaf

WHAT WE NEED

140 gms All purpose flour

110 gms Whole wheat flour

30 gms Wheat bran

1 1/2 tsp Salt

1 tsp Instant yeast

26 gms Honey

20 gms Oil

226 gms Warm water

Mix of seeds

 

WHAT TO DO

  • Mix all the ingredients except the seeds and form a dough
  • Cover and let it rise till it flattens or collapses which should take around 2 hours
  • Refrigerate for 2-3 hours
  • Take out the dough and sprinkle some flour on it and shape it like a ball by pulling the dough back on all 4 sides
  • Grease an 81/2″ * 4 1/2 ” pan
  • Pull the dough to form an oval shape and drop it in the loaf pan
  • Cover and let it rest for 90 minutes
  • Preheat the oven at 250C with an empty tray at the lowest rack
  • Sprinkle some flour and slash the dough on top
  • Pour 1 cup hot water on the empty tray in the oven
  • Bake the loaf on the middle rack for 50-55 minutes till it is richly brown
  • Let it cool completely on a wire rack before slicing
  • Enjoy!

DSC_1159

 

This is part of the Bake-a-thon 2017

Khobz dyal Zraa’ – Moroccan Wheat Bread

DSC_1146

Another awesome part of baking bread is the scoring of the dough before baking. Scoring is simply slashing the dough top so that we are able to control where the bread expands from. When you score the bread with a pretty design it adds a delightful artistic side to the loaf, a treat to the eyes and you are in awe of it even before biting into the first slice. Though it appears easy, scoring requires a little confidence and quite a bit of practice. The tool used to score dough is called lame and it is basically a regular blade mounted on a stand. As usual, this is not available in India and so I fashioned myself one in order to be able to score the dough well. This is my first effort with my new tool and it doesn’t look too bad for a first attempt, right? Despite a slightly misshapen loaf, that is.

DSC_1132

Bread is an integral part of Moroccan cuisine and they have a wide variety of breads, both dough raising and flat breads. I picked the whole wheat bread which has an equal amount of whole wheat and all purpose flour. This bread is a relatively flat bread and needs only one rise which makes it a comparatively faster bake. But because of the low hydration, the air pockets are not huge but small and uniform throughout.

DSC_1149

Recipe adapted from here

Makes 1 large loaf

WHAT WE NEED

135 gms All purpose flour

135 gms Whole wheat flour

1 1/2 tsp Instant yeast

180 gms Warm water

1 tsp Salt

1 tbsp Oil

1 tbsp Honey

 

WHAT TO DO

  • Mix the all purpose flour, whole wheat flour and salt together
  • Make a well in the middle and add the yeast
  • Add the oil, honey and water to the yeast and mix it first
  • Then mix with the flours to form a dough
  • Knead for 6-7 minutes till you get a soft pliable dough
  • Set aside for 15 minutes
  • Grease a baking tray and sprinkle some semolina
  • Press down the dough with the palm of your hand to make a 1/4″ thick circle
  • Cover with a kitchen towel and set aside for 1 hour
  • Preheat the oven at 250C
  • Sprinkle some flour on top and slash the dough in any pattern of your choice
  • Put the dough into the oven and reduce the temperature to 220C
  • Bake for 10 minutes
  • Turn the tray around and bake for another 10 minutes or till the loaf acquires a rich brown colour
  • Take it out of the oven and cool on a rack
  • Enjoy!

DSC_1173

This is my post for the Blogging Marathon under the theme, ‘Moroccan Cuisine’.

BMLogo

Check out the Blogging Marathon page for the other Blogging Marathoners doing this BM

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is part of the Bake-a-thon 2017